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Cats and canine parvovirus

Clegg SR, Coyne KP, Dawson S, et al. Canine parvovirus in asymptomatic feline carriers. Vet Microbiol 2012;157:78-85.
 
Parvoviruses are important pathogens of dogs and cats, and have a high mutation rate. The canine strains that have emerged in recent years have the ability to infect and cause disease in cats as well as dogs. These investigators looked at the numbers of healthy cats in rescue shelters that harbor canine parvovirus in their feces. In fact, CPV was found in one-third of cats in a cat-only rescue shelter and a mixed rescue shelter. Interestingly, no feline parvovirus was found in these cats. Also interesting was the fact that none of the cats were clinically ill. This indicates that normal cats could potentially be shedding canine parvovirus and may be a potential source for dogs in the same environment. [MK]

See also: Battilani M, Balboni A, Ustulin M, et al. Genetic complexity and multiple infections with more Parvovirus species in naturally infected cats. Vet Res 2011;42:43. [free, full text article